Currying in JavaScript

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Hello developers!! In this part of the series, we will discuss techniques to work with function in Javascript called Currying.

What is Currying?

Currying is the technique of converting a function that takes multiple arguments into a sequence of functions that each take a single argument.

It keeps returning a new function until all the arguments are exhausted. The arguments are kept "alive"(via closure) and all are used in execution when the final function in the currying chain is returned and executed.

Currying is a transformation of functions that translates a function from callable as f(a, b, c) into callable as f(a)(b)(c).

The benefit of currying isn't really in the definition, but the code you use to call that function.

Currying doesn’t call a function. It just transforms it.

We can implement function currying using two methods:

If you are not aware of what bind() method and closures is so I highly recommend you to read the previous article in this series about this topic for clear understanding.

Let's try to understand how we can implement currying using both of these methods using an example.

Currying using bind() method

function multiply(a, b){
    console.log(a * b);
}

let multiplyByTwo = multiply.bind(this, 2);
console.log(multiplyByTwo);
multiplyByTwo(5);
multiplyByTwo(6);

image.png

bind() method gives us a copy of the multiply method and it does not invoke it directly.

So, in the above code snippet, we are permanently assigning a value of parameter a as 2 and then reuse the multiplyByTwo method to assign the value of parameter b.

Look at another example to make it more clear.

function multiply(a, b){
    console.log(a * b);
}

let multiplyByTwo = multiply.bind(this, 2);
console.log("multiplyByTwo method")
multiplyByTwo(5);
multiplyByTwo(6);

let multiplyByFive = multiply.bind(this, 5);
console.log("multiplyByFive method")
multiplyByFive(5);
multiplyByFive(6);

image.png

So in this way, we can reuse our function using currying.

Currying using closures

Closure makes currying possible in JavaScript. Closure gives you access to an outer function’s scope from an inner function.

It’s the ability to retain the state of functions already executed, gives us the ability to create factory functions — functions that can add a specific value to their argument.

In the below example we are using the concept of closure to implement function currying.

function multiply(a){
    return function(b){
        console.log(a * b);
    }
}

let multiplyByTwo = multiply(2);
console.log("multiplyByTwo method")
multiplyByTwo(5);
multiplyByTwo(6);

image.png

In the above code snippet, multiply(2) will return a function having a=2 predefined, and then we will assign a value of b using multiplyByTwo(5).

Now look at the another example:

function multiply(a){
    return function(b){
        console.log(a * b);
    }
}

multiply(2)(10);

image.png

In the above example, a is equal to 2 and b is equal to 10.

Advantages of Currying

  • Increase Code reusability.
  • Avoid frequently calling a function with the same argument.
  • Make your code easier to refactor.

That's all about function currying in Javascript. The idea behind currying is to take a function and derive a function that returns a specialized function(s).

Wrap Up!!

Thanks for reading!! I hope you enjoyed learning about the concept of currying.

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